(Mis)adventures of converting a stone barn to a dwelling
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Demolition Day

By this point, we’d made a habitable space inside, but the old outbuilding remained and was causing us problems and looked a mess.
So we decided it was time to remove it (carefully) as there was a risk if something went wrong of bringing the back of the house down as the trusses were very embedded into the main walls…

The back wall of the house had been missing, so as part of the door work, we’d built a new replacement block wall.

New rear wall for the inside of the house. When we bought the property this entire wall was missing, to give access to the loft of the tin cowshed.

With that we started to carefully dismantle the outbuildings. First the extension out the rear.

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Using the clamshell bucket to grip the sheets, they were pulled off sheet by sheet, and as the blockwork was exposed, it was removed too. Note the truss supported on a acro to stop it dropping out.

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The engine in rex had always been problematic for overheating, and this day it seemed worse than ever, so we gave it regular cooling down periods to stop it getting so hot it seized.

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Then the inevitable breakdown happened, though from a new direction. The alternator seized and this caused the fan belt to destroy itself. No fear, an alternator from a rangerover was pressed into service and new brackets and pulley made to suit.

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And finally at last, the truss was out safely without destroying the original wall. We stopped for lunch with Pip and Amelia out to survey the result once the rubble had stopped flying.

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With the last bit of rubble to clear, theres always time for Jacques to try and have a mess around in it being a typical boy.

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September 22, 2011 This post was written by Categories: Building No comments yet


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